PixelineFeline

True gender equality is actually perceived as inequality. A group that is made up of 50% women is perceived as being mostly women. A situation that is perfectly equal between men and women is perceived as being biased in favor of women.
And if you don’t believe me, you’ve never been a married woman who kept her family name. I have had students hold that up as proof of my “sexism.”
My own brother told me that he could never marry a woman who kept her name because “everyone would know who ruled that relationship.” Perfect equality – my husband keeps his name and I keep mine – is held as a statement of superiority on my part.

Lucy, When Worlds Collide: Fandom and Male Privilege

Also the study where they had women and men talking in a discussion and when women spoke around 30% of the time, men perceived them as dominating the discussion. They didn’t consider it “equal” until something like 5-10% of women talking. (via dumbthingswhitepplsay)

Voila. A beautiful example of why fighting for equality becomes a gross exaggeration in the eyes of the oppressors. (via curiouslycool)

(Source: seaofbadstories, via kristinetuna)

artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)

Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.

The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

—Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

(via mydrunkkitchen)